Back to doing Computer Tune-ups & Fixes and Upgrades

I am keeping it simple! Need help! email me @mikescomputersdenver@gmail.com
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Microsoft is killing off Windows Live Mail – what should I do?

Microsoft has announced its email program will stop working with services including Hotmail, Live Mail, MSN Mail and Outlook.com

I have used Windows Live mail since its introduction: it’s simple, clear and uncluttered. Now Microsoft is going to end it. Help! With its automatic sign-in, I haven’t used my passwords in years. How can I transfer my accounts?

Windows Live Mail is a desktop email program Microsoft introduced to replace Outlook Express. It is part of the Windows essentials suite, which includes several fine programs: Live Mail, Live Writer, Photo Gallery, MovieMaker and OneDrive. (It used to include Messenger, which was replaced by Skype.) Unfortunately, the suite has not been updated since 2012, because Microsoft switched to developing securely sandboxed, touch-oriented apps instead.

Windows Live Mail 2012 will not stop working, and you can still use it to download emails from any standard email service. However, Microsoft is moving all its own email services – Office 365, Hotmail, Live Mail, MSN Mail, Outlook.com etc – to a single codebase at Outlook.com. Windows Live Mail 2012 does not support the new APIs (applications programming interfaces) required to provide full synchronisation with Outlook.com. Microsoft could update Windows Live Mail 2012, but instead, it has asked users to switch to a different email program.

Microsoft suggests …

Microsoft suggests using either its free Mail app or Outlook, the email and personal information manager that is part of Microsoft Office. Outlook costs money, but Microsoft is offering Live Mail users a free subscription to Office 365 for one year. (You should have received this offer by email, but if not, the details are online.)

The obvious catch is that, after the first year, you’d be paying £59.99 per year for Office 365 Personal, though this does include full copies of Microsoft Office programs plus a 1TB free online storage. Alternatively, you could buy a standalone copy of Microsoft Office Home and Business 2016 (£164) or Microsoft Office Outlook 2016 instead. These don’t expire.

Either way, it is a slightly awkward choice: you can upgrade to Outlook or downgrade to Mail, but you can’t stay at the same level.

The Mail app is simpler but less powerful than Windows Live Mail: it has limited options for sorting emails, and it cannot send emails to groups. Outlook is far more powerful than Windows Live Mail and has more advanced features for emails, contacts, calendars and to-do lists. However, you may not need them, or you may already be using a range of apps instead.

The Mail app has another drawback: it runs on Windows 8/8.1/10, but not on Windows XP/Vista/7. Some people who want to use the Mail app will have to upgrade to Windows 10 to get it.

Read more

Microsoft’s final suggestion is to do your email in a web browser. Your email address and your Hotmail/Live/Outlook.com email service will continue to work, even if Windows Live Mail 2012 doesn’t. Of course, web-based email has similar drawbacks as the Mail app – fewer features and limited sorting options – and is slower to use, but today it’s probably how most people do email.

Sticking with Windows Live Mail

Windows Live Mail 2012 is clearly on the way out, but you can still use it if you really want to. To do this, you must create a new account for your existing email address, but check the box that says “Manually configure server settings”. For the incoming server, select IMAP with the address imap-mail.outlook.com and Port 993. For the outgoing server, use smtp-mail.outlook.com and Port 587.

Live Mail grab

Facebook Twitter Pinterest WLM server settings Photograph: Jack Schofield/Screengrab

The settings shown in the screenshot worked perfectly for one of my old Hotmail accounts even though Windows Live Mail didn’t work with the automatic settings.

Once you have downloaded your emails using the new settings, you can use the mouse to drag-and-drop emails across from the “old” Microsoft account, but don’t delete it. Your “new” account only does email, so you will lose the address book/contacts and calendar features.

Switching clients

If you decide to switch to the Mail app or Microsoft Office Outlook, then you will need to import your emails from Windows Live Mail. There are lots of ways to do this, and Microsoft provided reasonably clear instructions along with the announcement: Windows Live Mail 2012 will not connect to Outlook.com

Windows Live Mail actually stores individual emails in industry standard .eml files, so they’re easy to back up and move between programs or between PCs. (Microsoft Office Outlook, by contrast, stores everything in one giant blob of a .pst file.)

One problem: some users may have emails stored on their PCs that are no longer on the server. In that case, see “Special instructions for users of locally stored data in Windows Live Mail 2012 application” on the same page.

Of course, rather than switching to the Mail app or Microsoft Office Outlook you could switch to an alternative from a third-party supplier. Examples include Mailbird, eM Client, and Thunderbird. I’d try them in that order and see which one you like. Both Mailbird and eM Client are “freemium” programs, while Thunderbird is open source and free.

Thank You The Guardian

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UPDATE:

  Things have finally calmed down, Mom is a little better however she still cannot drive. 

My Breathing is a little worse, Pain level is there? I am terribly bored. So back to work. I am going to keep it simple and will only be doing Repairs, Tune-ups, and Upgrades if needed. More important is I need to work for my sake and a few extra bucks would not hurt me. 

So if your computer is running slow or just crappie give me a call or email me at:

           Web Site:                        mikes-Computers.org

           Email:                              markfifty5@gmail.com

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Mikes Computers News!

To all my friends & Customers;

First of all I would like to thank all of you for your trust and business, more importantly your friendship.

Going on 18 years, Mikes Computers has given computer care for several business, schools and homes. It has been my honor to service the Denver Metro Area. My success has been due to God, sobriety, honesty & trust. I hope I have given good personal service to all my family, friends & customers!

As most of you know, the last 6 yrs. for me and Mikes Computers have been a real challenge due to my medical problems, plus my Mom has been very ill also, she has almost died several times during this period. So I have been taking care of her, as she also takes care of me!  I lost my sister to cancer during this time frame plus my best friend Ronnie, then his brother, then his mother! So it’s been tough 6 yrs. Not counting the other family and friends I have lost during this period.  My physical abilities have dwindled, (I have prepared for that) what I have not prepared for is my memory?

That is my main problem right now, my breathing is rougher and my pain level is out the door most of the time, but not being able to remember short term stuff is really effecting me and my ability to function as a human let alone a computer Tech?

So starting in May, Mikes Computers will start closing, I have lots of parts and spare computers I need to put together and sell. I do plan on having a massive Computer Parts Garage Sale this summer.

Now I am not closing completely, but what I have to do is slow down and simplify my life. I love fixing & building computers, plus the people I have meant have been just awesome! I love People, You my customers have been great! God blessed me with the best customers on the planet.  He blessed me with the ability to fix and build computers this also includes Macs and other devices. I have really surprised myself with this ability. Thank You God!!!

So, the next few months that is what I will be doing is cleaning and getting rid of a lot of my stuff. I have 17 yrs. of computer parts to deal with. I don’t want my family to have to deal with it when I am gone? So if you are interested in parts or no someone who might be? I will give a hell of a deal to a guy like me starting out in the business!

 

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Computer Problems or need a new computer!

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10 Tips to Speed Up Windows 10

How to Speed up Windows 10

As PC hardware continues to get faster, so does software, and Windows 10 is no exception. This is especially true of startup time: If you upgrade from Windows 7 or earlier, you’ll be pleasantly surprised by how fast your machine is ready for action. But there are other performance factors to consider after you’re up and running. We’ve compiled ten tips, many of which are perennial old standbys in the Windows performance game.

The problem with many Windows speedup stories is that they tell you to turn off some of the operating system’s more charming features such as visual animations. Most of the tips here show you ways you can speed up your Windows 10 system without compromising its appearance and functionality. Most are free, but some involve spending a little cash on software or hardware. For those with older, lower-power machines who want a speed boost but don’t care about extra goodies, a couple of the tips towards the end can boost system performance at the expense of some bells and whistles.

If you have your own tips for speeding up Windows 10, please don’t hesitate to post your suggestions in the comment section below.


1. Uninstall Crapware

1. Uninstall Crapware
That extra preinstalled software installed by PC makers continues to be an issue with new computers. I recently was working with a low-cost Lenovo PC that had nearly 20 so-called helper programs installed, and these would occasionally and unwantedly pop up and interrupt what I was doing on the computer.

Here’s how: Tap on the Start button (by default all the way in the lower-left corner of the display), then on All apps at the bottom, and then simply right-click on the offender and choose Uninstall. This will immediately uninstall. You can also right-click on the Windows logo Start button, and choose the top choice Programs and Features. You can also simply type Programs in the Cortana Ask me anything box next to the Start button.

You can usually find the culprits by sorting the list of installed apps on the name of your PC Maker. When you’ve found junk apps you don’t want, simply select them and click Uninstall. Unfortunately, you can only remove one at a time, so set aside a half hour or so for this project. Don’t forget to take the hatchet to apps you installed yourself but no longer want, and for software you don’t want that was installed alongside software you did want.

Keep in mind, with Windows 10 there are two kinds of applications, traditional desktop ones and modern Windows Store apps. To remove the latter, go to the Settings app’s Apps & Features page. There, you’ll see both kinds of apps, while the good ole Control Panel only includes good ole desktop programs. In either you can sort by size, date installed, or name, or search for a particular app.

The reason this helps performance is that many programs load processes at boot time and take up valuable RAM and CPU cycles. While you’re in the Programs and Features section of Control, you can also click Turn Windows Features On or Off and scan the list to see if there’s anything you don’t use. You might also try software like PCDecrapifier and Revo Uninstaller utilities. For more help on what to remove, read How to Clean Crapware From a New PC.


2. Limit Startup Processes

2. Limit Startup Processes
A lot of programs install side processes that run every time you start your PC, and some of them are not things you need running on your system all the time. Compared with Windows 7, in which you had to run the MSCONFIG utility, Windows 10 (and Windows 8.x before it) gives you a new, easier way to limit what runs at startup—from the updated Task Manager.

The easiest way to invoke the Task Manager is by pressing Ctrl-Shift-Esc. Switch to the Startup tab, and you’ll see all the programs that load at Windows startup. The dialog box even has a column that shows you the Startup impact for each. The Status column shows whether the program is enabled to run at startup or not. You can right-click on any entry to change this status. It’s usually fairly easy to see things you don’t want to run. For example, if you never use iTunes, you probably don’t need iTunesHelper to be running all the time.


3. Clean Up Your Disk

3. Clean Up Your Disk
From the Start menu, type Disk Cleanup. This opens the trusty Disk Cleanup utility that’s been part of Windows for several generations of the OS. Disk Cleanup finds unwanted junk and files such as temporary files, offline Web pages, and installer files on your PC and offers to delete them all at once. You may even find that your Recycle Bin is bulging at the seams: Mine had 1.47GB I didn’t know was there! This will generally only have a noticeable effect on speed if your drive is getting close to full, however. If you don’t have disk defragmentation scheduled regularly, set that up in the Optimize Drives tool, which you can find by typing its name in the Cortana search box next to the Start button. Another great tool for PC cleanup is Iolo System Mechanic 14, our Editors’ Choice for PC tune-up utilities.


4. Add More RAM

4. Add More RAM
Windows 10 isn’t as much of a hog as earlier versions of the OS, but more memory is always a way to speed up PC operations. For a lot of today’s Windows devices, such as the Surface convertible tablets, however, adding RAM isn’t an option. Gaming and business laptops often still allow RAM upgrades, but that’s becoming rarer by the year. The new, slimmer ultrabooks and convertibles are usually fixed. If you still use a desktop tower, this article can show you how to add RAM. The bigger RAM makers’ (Crucial, Kingston, Corsair) websites all offer product finders that show you which type of RAM your PC takes, and prices are pretty reasonable. I found 8GB high-performance DDR3 RAM for under $40 on Newegg.com.


5. Install an SSD Startup Drive

5. Install an SSD Startup Drive
This past year, I installed a solid-state (SSD) startup drive on my home desktop PC, and the result was a remarkable speedup. And not just for Windows startup, but for loading and using demanding applications such as Adobe Photoshop Lightroom. If you use a laptop, this may also be an option. For system speedup, it makes sense to replace your internal startup hard drive, but an external SSD with a USB 3.0 connection can also give you a speed boost in applications that use a lot of storage. For more info, you can check out PCMag’s article, The Best SSDs and How to Buy an SSD, or look through our recent storage reviews.


6. Check for Viruses and Spyware

6. Check for Viruses and Spyware
You can run the built-in Windows Defender or a third-party app to do this, but you’re best served by PCMag security guru Neil Rubenking’s top pick among malware-cleanup programs, Malwarebytes Anti-Malware—it’s free! But don’t forget to use ongoing anti-malware protection, too. Some of the AV products have a lighter footprint on system performance than others, and the lightest of all, according to Rubenking, is Webroot SecureAnywhere AntiVirus$18.99 at Webroot.


7. Change Power Settings to Maximum Performance

7. Change Power Settings to Maximum Performance
Of course, this isn’t a good choice if you want to save electricity, but it could boost your computing. Head to Control Panel / System and Security / Power Options. From here, click on the dropdown arrow on the right side and choose High Performance.


8. Use the Performance Troubleshooter

8. Use the Performance Troubleshooter
In Cortana’s search box next to the Start button, type troubleshooting and under System and Security, you’ll see the choice Check for performance issues. Run the troubleshooter and it may find the root cause of your slowdown. For good measure, run through the other troubleshooters, including System Maintenance, Search and Indexing, Hardware and Sounds, and Programs.


9. Change Appearance in Performance Options Dialog

9. Change Appearance in Performance Options Dialog
You can easily get to this by typing adjust appearance in Cortana. In the dialog, you can use the radio button at the top labeled Adjust for best performance or select which eye-candy features you can live without from the long list of check boxes below these choices. If you do choose the overall best-performance button, you’ll lose all of the visual effects. For example, you won’t see the contents of a window you’re dragging move, but rather just a rectangle representing the window’s edges. Keeping the effects that you enjoy checked in the dialog is probably a better way to go.


10. Turn off Search Indexing

10. Turn Off Search Indexing
Especially for lower-powered PCs, search indexing can eat up system resources, if only temporarily. If you do a lot of searching, this won’t appeal to you, as some searches will be slower. To turn off indexing, open the Indexing Options Control Panel window (you can also just type index in the Start button search box, and you should see Indexing Options at the top of the result list), click Modify and remove locations being indexed and file types, too.

If you want to leave search indexing on, but find that it occasionally slows you down, you can stop its process when you need extra speed. Right-click on Computer either in the Start menu or on the desktop, choose Manage. Then double-click Services and Applications, then Services. Find Windows Search, and double click on that. From this Properties dialog, you can choose a Startup type of Manual or Disabled to have the process silent by default. The new Automatic (Delayed Start) startup type according to Microsoft help, “is preferred over the Automatic startup type because it helps reduce the effect on the system’s overall boot performance.” That was the default on my upgraded Windows 10 PC.

Thank You PC Magazine!
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VETERANS DAY WEEKEND

To Them We Owe

 Happened today, and in the past;
Sacrifice made, for ours to last.

Wives to widows, families torn;
Gave their lives, for them we mourn.

Gone forever, souls are lost;
Freedom comes, with this cost.

Enjoy the life, they did preserve;
Fate they suffered, did not deserve.

On this day, lest we forget;
To them we owe, our life in debt.

by Don Nielsen

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A massive ransomware attack

A massive ransomware attack spread across the globe today, locking up thousands of hospital, telecommunications, and utilities systems in nearly 100 countries. The attack used data stolen from the NSA to exploit vulnerabilities in Microsoft Windows and deliver the WanaCrypt0r ransomware. The demand was for $300 per PC.

While the ransomware was first detected wreaking havoc in emergency rooms and doctors’ offices in the UK, the infection quickly spread worldwide, including to the US.

We’re alerting you to reassure you that if you’re currently using the premium version (or the premium trial) of Malwarebytes with real-time protection turned on, you are protected from this threat. Our premium technology blocks the WanaCrypt0r ransomware before it can encrypt your files. (The free version of Malwarebytes, however, does not protect you against WanaCrypt0r. To see which version you have, open up your Malwarebytes software and look for the version name at the top of the window.) Learn more about Malwarebytes

If you’re not currently using the premium version of Malwarebytes, we recommend that you update your Microsoft Windows software immediately. Microsoft released a patch for this vulnerability in March, but many users haven’t updated, leaving their computers open to this attack.

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Cisco 2017 Annual Cybersecurity Report

Learn security industry insights and key findings taken from threat intelligence and cybersecurity trends.

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10 ways to protect against hackers

Hackers are a scary bunch—whether working as part of a criminal syndicate or an idealist with a political agenda, they’ve got the knowledge and the power to access your most precious data. If hackers want to target a particular company, for example, they can find vast amounts of information on that company just by searching the web. They can then use that info to exploit weaknesses in the company’s security, which in turn puts the data you’ve entrusted to that company in jeopardy.

Think of your home computer as a company. What can you do to protect it against hackers? Instead of sitting back and waiting to get infected, why not arm yourself and fight back?

Bad guys, beware. We’ve got 10 ways to beat you.

  1. Update your OS and other software frequently, if not automatically. This keeps hackers from accessing your computer through vulnerabilities in outdated programs. For extra protection, enable Microsoft product updates so that the Office Suite will be updated at the same time. Consider retiring particularly susceptible software such as Java or Flash.
  2. Download up-to-date security programs, including antivirus and anti-malware software, anti-spyware, and a firewall (if your OS didn’t come pre-packaged with it). To trick even the most villainous hackers, consider investing in anti-exploit technology, such as Malwarebytes Anti-Exploit, so you can stop attacks before they happen.
  3. Destroy all traces of your personal info on hardware you plan on selling. Consider using d-ban to erase your hard drive. For those looking to pillage your recycled devices, this makes information much more difficult to recover. If the information you’d like to protect is critical enough, the best tool for the job is a chainsaw.
  4. Do not use open wifi; it makes it too easy for hackers to steal your connection and download illegal files. Protect your wifi with an encrypted password, and consider refreshing your equipment every few years. Some routers have vulnerabilities that are never patched. Newer routers allow you to provide guests with segregated wireless access. Plus, they make frequent password changes easier.
  5. Speaking of passwords: password protect all of your devices, including your desktop, laptop, phone, smartwatch, tablet, camera, lawnmower…you get the idea. The ubiquity of mobile devices makes them especially vulnerable. Lock your phone and make the timeout fairly short. Use fingerprint lock for the iPhone and passkey or swipe for Android. “It’s easy to forget that mobile devices are essentially small computers that just happen to fit in your pocket and can be used as a phone,” says Jean-Philippe Taggart, Senior Security Researcher at Malwarebytes. “Your mobile device contains a veritable treasure trove of personal information and, once unlocked, can lead to devastating consequences.”
  6. Sensing a pattern here? Create difficult passwords and change them frequently. In addition, never use the same passwords across multiple services. If that’s as painful as a stake to a vampire’s heart, use a password manager like LastPass. For extra hacker protectant, ask about two-step authentication. Several services have only recently started to offer two-factor authentication, and they require the user to initiate the process. Trust us, the extra friction is worth it. Two-factor authentication makes taking over an account that much more difficult, and on the flip side, much easier to reclaim should the worst happen.
  7. Come up with creative answers for your security questions. People can now figure out your mother’s maiden name or where you graduated from high school with a simple Google search. Consider answering like a crazy person. If Bank of America asks, “What was the name of your first boyfriend/girlfriend?” reply “your mom.” Just don’t forget that’s how you answered when they ask you again.
  8. Practice smart surfing and emailing. Phishing campaigns still exist, but hackers have become much cleverer than that Nigerian prince who needs your money. Hover over links to see the actual email address from which the email was sent. Is it really from the person or company claiming to send them? If you’re not sure, pay attention to awkward sentence construction and formatting. If something still seems fishy, do a quick search on the Internet for the subject line. Others may have been scammed and posted about it online.
  9. Don’t link accounts. If you want to comment on an article and you’re prompted to sign in with Twitter or Facebook, do not go behind the door. “Convenience always lessens your security posture,” says Taggart. “Linking accounts allows services to acquire a staggering amount of personal information.”
  10. Keep sensitive data off the cloud. “No matter which way you cut it, data stored on the cloud doesn’t belong to you,” says Taggart. “There are very few cloud storage solutions that offer encryption for ‘data at rest.’ Use the cloud accordingly. If it’s important, don’t.”
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